Sunday, July 12, 2009

I love this loom!

It's hard to believe I got the loom in the fall of 2007. I wonder how old the loom is. I don't know how long it's been since Crisp looms were made. I wonder just how many of the "Ruthie" looms were built and if they were done on order. I thoroughly enjoy using it even through it doesn't have a brake system that uses a worm gear, as on the Fireside tapestry loom--the one that's based on the original Ruthie concept. I could probably retro-fit the loom with that particular brake but until I really run upon a problem of advancing the warp I'll keep it as it is.



One of the things I really appreciate about the loom is the distance I'm able to weave before having to roll the tapestry around. This gives quite a number of inches that I can see as the tapestry progresses... about 28" up. I also like the three sets of treadles. While I don't always treadle for the shed (sometimes I leave one shed open and then pick the other shed if I'm weaving back and forth in a small area), having the three sets at different spots across the 60" width of the loom is quite nice.

I have a low bench that came with the loom... it's a homemade one without fancy finish. I've got it covered with a couple of Spelsau sheep skins for padding. I'm using Gobelin-style bobbins and the baskets I keep them in (when they aren't spread around me) I usually find at the local thrift store. The basket bin there has all shapes and sizes, .50 each. I bring them home, spray off with the garden hose, let them dry and then have lots of "new" bobbin baskets. I just realized there aren't any of these baskets o'bobbins showing in this shot... but they're there, just out of sight.

OK... time to go home. Studio hours are over today!

5 comments:

Theresa said...

What a beautiful functional loom. I can understand why you enjoy working on it. The tapestry is spectacular. Thank you for sharing your beautiful work!

Jennifer said...

It's beautiful Tommye - the loom and the piece. I'm enjoying seeing you explore this new direction for your work!

Unknown said...

My friend John Iversen is the one who designed the Crisp tapestry looms. He is living up in Washington now. Dan Shapiro

PedleyDan said...

My friend John Iversen is the one who designed the Crisp tapestry looms. He is living up in Washington now. Dan Shapiro

Tommye McClure Scanlin said...

Dan,
Is there someway I can contact your friend, Mr. Iverson? I'm so curious about the history of this loom--and others built by this company in the 1980s.